Why the iPad 3’s retina display is a game changer

Apple went to significant trouble to stuff a Retina display in the new iPad3. The battery had to be made bigger to provide the same endurance with more pixels, so the entire chassis is a bit bigger and get viagra prescription thicker than before.

Was it worthwhile? Absolutely. The new retina display is a game changer that makes all previous tablets look like dinosaurs. You’re going to want to have a tablet with a high-resolution display from now on – and here’s why.
ipad3

Text Looking Fine

 

ipad3 text

The sharpness of the new display is obvious from the moment you use the iPad 3. Packing a resolution of 2048×1536 into a small area makes everything look precise and detailed in a way that isn’t possible on other tablets. That’s nice. But sharper image quality isn’t a game-changer. To see where the retina display really pays for itself, you need to load up a webpage or document with fine text.

With more pixels packed tighter, the display can handle small fonts that simply blur and pixelate on other tablets. The difference is subtle until you place two tablets side-by-side. That’s when it hits you. The new iPad can display virtually what a person can possibly read, and it looks good while doing it, even if you hold the tablet absurdly close to your face.

 

It’s Not Just The Pixels

 

ipad3 resolution

Most people have spoken about the resolution upgrade of the iPad 3 as if that was the only enhancement. It isn’t. Apple has also improved image quality by increasing the color gamut supported.

According to testing by Tom’s Hardware the iPad 3 can render about 66% of the Adobe RGB1998 color gamut. Far from perfect, to be sure – but significantly better than the previous iPad and better than any Android tablet, as well. Colors seem to have more “punch” and the contrast between dark and bright areas is more definitive than your typical tablet display.

 

But what about the images?

 

iPad 3 images

 

Both images are being displayed on the webpage at 450 x 539.  The only difference is the image on the right is actually a 900 x 1078 image (double the size).  Now, you would never have an image be double the size because you’re just wasting bandwidth.  But that’s what you need to do for the iPad 3.  Otherwise, your images would potentially display blurry (like the image on the left) when the iPad 3 doubles the size of it.

You can try it for your self.  On your iPad 3, check out this test page.  On a regular display (or older iPad), both images will look exactly the same.  On the iPad 3, though, you’ll see the “regular” image is blurry while the high resolution image is clear.

 

Solutions

If you want to update your site for the new iPad, there are a couple ways you can do it.

Media Queries: With media queries, you can swap out your background images for higher resolution versions.  This is isn’t too tricky and will keep your users from downloading both the high resolutions and low resolutions versions.  There are two drawbacks:

  1. You have to maintain two sets of images (a high-res version and cheapest viagra price usa pharmacies a low-res version)
  2. This will only work in CSS.  Media Queries won’t help solve issues where you are using the <img /> element.

Responsive Images:  The Filament Group has developed a method called Responsive Images which, using a custom data attribute, allows you to specify both the low resolution and high resolution version of your image.  With a little help from JavaScript, high resolution sources are swapped out before images are downloaded.  This way the user gets the correct version. Similar to the media queries method, you still have to maintain two sets of images and some Content Management Systems (like WordPress) might make it more difficult to implement a Responsive Image layout.

Adaptive Images: Adaptive Images come at it from the other direction.  They have you place the high resolution version of your image in your design.  Then, using a little PHP and JavaScript magic, they determine what size is optimal for the user and cut the image down before it’s downloaded.  The benefit of this method is that you only maintain a single image (the high resolutions version).  The drawback is that it requires PHP and, if the users doesn’t support JavaScript, will fallback to the high resolution version.

Hopefully this helps identify a couple ways you can start taking advantage of the retina display in the iPad 3.

Sources: www.makeuseof.com/tag/ipad-3s-retina-display-game-changer-opinion/ by Matt Smith

and: www.blog.easelsolutions.com/2012/03/ipad-retina-and-web-design/

 

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The advantages of a mobile website


The mobile web experience represents the web designers’ new frontier today. Recent statistics show that 70% of the world’s population owns a mobile phone and these figures will only continue increasing in the years to come. Designing websites for the traditional desktop browser alone is no longer considered enough to set a standard in the industry. Nowadays, almost every website can benefit from a mobile version. The standard mobile website should accommodate the smaller screen resolution of mobile web browsers and serve as a simplified version of your regular site. However, in order to “go where no one has gone before”, building custom mobile websites capable of providing a richer mobile browsing experience while retaining the full functionality of the classic website has become a necessity and mobile Internet usage poses a whole new set of challenges to be dealt with by web designers worldwide.

With a large variety of mobile devices available on today’s market, important decisions must be reached, such as which devices the mobile websites should support and brand kamagra professional what screen resolutions to target. And these are only two of the many questions to be answered in this field. Here are several types of websites which benefit more than others from having a mobile version integrated together with the classic desktop one:

  • Local businesses benefit significantly from having a mobile website, as this gives them another efficient and customer friendly way to communicate.
  • E-Commerce sites can reach customers as easily as possible and make their lives buying your products, as easy as possible.
  • News-driven and blog sites allow easier access to up-to-date information to their audiences, as quickly and efficiently as possible.

There are some requirements to consider with a mobile website:

  • Smaller size web pages. Advanced mobile devices have the ability to display any web page in its real desktop view, but this is not the case with the average mobile phone. Hence, for swift operation on any kind of mobile device, it is a must that a mobile site is written in code that makes the overall page small.
  • Faster loading time. Having a smaller sized page certainly makes a mobile site load quicker. While most major carriers are moving to 4G speed, some users are still accessing the internet on slower speeds like EDGE and GPRS.
  • Content adaptability. Not all mobile device browsers behave in the same way and it is very important to make sure your content works on one mobile device without breaking another.
  • Ease of use. It’s not enough to have a mobile site — it should also be attractive and easy to use. This site should be less cluttered and should have all the links to key services in an easy to reach way.

Mobile sites are very often just a scaled-down version of the classic desktop website. These can be designed from that simple one page with the company’s brand and contact information to the full-scale and functionality applications like Facebook, that are designed specifically for mobile devices. However, in almost all instances content is extremely scaled back to suit the delivery method. The question is no longer whether or not a business should have a mobile website. The main challenge is now represented by how the classic business website should be reduced to the scale of the mobile phone screen in order to retain and provide the full experience of the main site with full capabilities such as browsing and purchasing products.

But what about Google? It’s important for you to know that Google has its own separate index for mobile sites (this means that you have to add your site to the mobile index just like you added your conventional site to Google’s traditional site index). So, if you create a mobile version of your website you stand a significantly greater chance of showing up higher in search rankings. We actually wonder if there is still anyone out there thinking that the mobile website will remain merely just a quick way to contact the company?

As mobile devices and tablet computers proliferate, mobile websites are becoming an important feature for companies that maintain an internet presence. While mobile hardware and operating systems continue to improve, these devices are not yet on a level playing field with desktop computers. Lower screen resolution, faster loading time, content adaptability, and ease of use dictate a specific approach to succeeding in a mobile environment. Therefore, some new concepts to be explored in view of integration with mobile sites are relating to how users will interact with the website, how they’ll use search functions and what the company’s goals will be in respect to enriching their mobile experience.

Displayed above are several examples of mobile websites that have taken these challenges head on. They are easy to navigate and elegant, while effectively promoting the company’s brand products and business goals.

 

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Functional Design


“Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.”
Steve Jobs

With Smartphones, users have “the internet in their pocket.” Going online is convenient and easy. Here’s the catch: they’re viewing the full-sized internet on a pint-sized screen. Most websites were not designed to be smartphones friendly, and essential business information like phone numbers and e-mails can be hard to access.

Your Website, Designed and Optimized for Business on the Go

We put you at your customer’s fingertips! smartphones owners are movers and shakers: they’re on the go and don’t have time to fumble and scroll for information they need. If you have a hard-to-navigate site, they’ll probably do business elsewhere.

At Webige.com, we create fully customized versions of your website formatted for the smartphones’ screen and specifically designed so visitors can take immediate action. Our smartphones optimized websites are effortless to navigate, have buttons big enough for the nubbiest of fingers and work seamlessly. With the tap of a finger, a client can do business with you.

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